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, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get
the united states. he has served as president as the atlantic monthly magazine, executive vice president of u.s. news and world report, and the co-editor of roll-call. we are delighted that he is here to comment on the subject. >> i want to begin by congratulating the doug and bill. this is an excellent study and i have to say i have read about three dozens of these and i even wrote one of them, which some people consider the best. this is an excellent report, for reasons i will go into. it urges america to show how to organize the government to do that. the current administration, not just the war of ideas as an activity, but the very phrase is now anathema, a sad development. this became evident to me when i started meeting with members of the foreign-policy team and was warned it would be unwise if i wanted to have any impact on their thinking to use the term "war of ideas." i am not sure which of the two is more offensive. my own authorization was clear. in the long run, winning the war on terror means winning the battle of ideas. it could not be clearer than that. around the same time, p
you would expect the president of the united states to be careful, and the secretary of state. and they are. we should not allow ourselves to be dragged into a theological argument. that is not their job. and then you focus on the real issue. americans have a problem with embassies. since 1979, no country in the world has problems with indices like the americans. -- indices like the americans. -- embassies like the americans. i have respect for all religions. i have a jaundiced view of turbaned men engaging in politics. did you see muslim embassies being stormed to anywhere in the world? >> i know you want to comment on that. i do think -- let's keep it to egypt. there is a feeling that we have lost their way a little bit. there was not that much support for the democratic uprisings in the region. it came to the question of mubarak a little bit belatedly. the perception in the white house, we got dragged into libya in an operation that we were not that enthusiastic about. when you're keeping as far away as possible -- we are keeping as far away as possible from what is going o
of the united states and courageous in many instances, a proponent on behalf of a moral society, everything we hoped the region will become, he has stood for. i encourage you to look into his case which is well documented. he has now had to leave to the northern region for protection because of the way the current government has treated him. it is terrible not to back up our friends who are moderate in the region. it is concerning that there is not more awareness about his plight. what is your view of our relationship with the regional government in the north, the kurdish regional government. apparently is safer than the rest of iraq. how is our relationship with them and how do you envision our relationship with the moving forward? >> i will look into the case personally and we will get back to you and your staff. regarding the north, we are very supportive of the autonomous region of the north and you are right that it has progressed in many ways. that is an example job -- not just for the country but the region and what can be. we will continue to support them and work with them as part of
was that, as the group here in the united states -- the united way is allowed to deduct from paychecks, yes? in order to have their funding, we wanted to have the same kind of thing possible for this international overseas giving program, which encompassed about 10 very worthy groups. we were actually beaten down on that by the united way who did not want anyone else to have such president, such a privilege, even though the funds -- such a precedent, such a privilege, even though the funds would not be competitive. it would not be going to anybody else in the country but overseas. isen's health care considered in many places a luxury and certainly far down on the list of the imperatives for that nation's funding. >> what should we take away from the virginia state legislators attend to require ultrasound for any women seeking abortions. [laughter] >> you know, it is a good thing my daughter is here. i woke up this morning -- somebody had brought this up yesterday and i was so bloody angry i said, you know what i am tempted to say and she said, don't say that, mom. so i will follow my daught
monument in the united states of america. most people have never heard of it. i have never heard of it before i made this movie. it is sitting on top of a hill in massachusetts. it is 180 tons of granite. it is the largest solid granite monument in that united states. it laid out our forefather strategy for how to build and sustain a free and just society. it is called the monuments of our forefathers. it is hidden behind a forest of trees in a residential area. you would not even know it is there are less you stumbled into it or you're going there specifically to see it. it stands there today. i must explain it to you. it is utterly fascinating. she is 81 feet tall. her name is faith. she stands tall with her finger pointed to heaven, the god of heaven. the storm on her forehead represents was done. in her left hand she holds the word of god. it is the geneva bible. this is the bible that predates the king james bible. they brought that with them. our forefathers believe that we must have faith in the true god of heaven and in his word. his word would give you wisdom on how to l
and bring it back to the united states of america. we need a big bridge near washington, missouri. we need more highways and missouri. we need dam projects on the missouri river. i disagree with that. >> the center mention something about your position on competitive contracts. did you want to respond? >> i believe competitive bidding is a good thing. what you have going in iraq is pretty interesting. you had people who were terrorists. anything anybody did, they would load up or shoot anybody associated with it. -- they would blow it up or shoot anybody associated with it. the attacks on the idea of roads in afghanistan, the big economy and afghanistan is heroin. her win, you can put on a motorcycle -- heroin, you can put on a motorcycle and take somewhere. i have a kid serving in afghanistan. i he a kid almost killed in iraq. i understand the cost of what we are doing. i want to do it in the right way. >> did you want an additional 45 seconds? >>here was nothing about the contract and in iraq that did that require a competitive luck. there was nothing about that contracting. they finally
and wind. that is why in the united states congress earlier this year, a bipartisan majority said we need to extend those tax credits. the oil industry, the gas industry, but coal industry and the nuclear industry have benefited from tens of billions of dollars of subsidies for many years. it is time to get a level playing field. in the meantime, we are playing catch up for the energy of the future. we will not run out of wind or solar. eventually, we will run out of oil and coal. the others will get cheaper. if you go to california or nevada or colorado, those are the energy future -- that is why there is bipartisan support for the clean energy credit. host: gene clearly did not answer your question, which was could the solar and wind sources work without subsidies? guest: we do not find them working without subsidies anywhere purified natural gas and petroleum working fine without subsidies. that is the oil companies get tens of billions of dollars of subsidies per year. that is not right. even to get the $4 billion the president talks about, you get all that from section 199 tax credit
. they have grown up taking for granted that an african-american can the president of the united states of america. isn't that part of the great american story of? it is the story of risk taking progress from one generation to the next, the story of unwavering hope. it is the story of men and women who said to themself "i might not the film my dream, but if i stand strong on this bridge, if i endure another night in his jail cell that may be my children will fulfil their dreams, maybe my grandchildren will." a person he purrs the says "all these people were still living by faith when they died." they did not receive the things promised. the only saw them and welcome them in the distance. they're all the many heartbreaks and trials, you have kept the faith. you could only see the promised land from a distance. you never let it out of your sight. today if we are willing to work for it, if we are willing to sacrifice for it, then i know we can carry on that legacy. i know that we can meet our obligation to continue the struggle. i know we can finish the journey we started and felt the prom
of student achievement, the united states often comes in at about average, but they do not mention that if you take all the schools in america with less than 1% poverty, we are number one in the world. it says we're doing a good job for some, but not all. we have got to figure that out. we have got to figure out what to do to overcome those obstacles to give the students an opportunity to succeed. host: you told npr just this last week that unions are losing education reform in and certain areas. host: one of the things we have to change is the whole -- who is coming into the teaching profession? there is no system for recruitment for public education. no business of any size could survive with that kind of turnover. it costs too much to recruit, train, and hire people. no one should be allowed in a classroom with 30 or 40 students as a teacher of record is not fully trained, license, or certified. from day number one to the last day in the plot -- in the classroom, policy shouldn't dance practice with a good evaluations systems and feedback about what can be done differently to do
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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